Content marketing and Copywriting with Rhubarb Fool Part IV

21
Feb
2014

Content marketing and Copywriting with Rhubarb Fool Part IV

Content marketing and Copywriting with Rhubarb Fool Part IV

Are these just different legs of the same (chocolate) table?

Know Your Audience. Know their taste. Give them what they want.

Moving into 2014, I'm sure we've all read a lot about knowing your audience. So to help us produce high quality copy, that delivers relevance and worth, let's think about the issues that are relevant to our audience and try and understand these.

What are your audience's needs and wants?

What is the current expectation set of your customers and how to you anticipate this changing?

How is your company's product or service relevant, desirable or necessary to your audience?

But simply collecting and collating this information isn’t going to be enough. To truly interact with your audience, you need to walk in their shoes and make sure that you understand how and why they react like they do. Succeed in doing this and you’ll be able to apply some of the tip-top strategies for 2014. Let's set these out as follows:

1. Tap into those fundamental human emotions.

A bar of chocolate not only tastes good, it also tickles us visually. It's appealing to the eye. Sometimes the simple colour of a bar of chocolate is sufficient to trigger an emotional response. You can accurately anticipate the taste of a bar of chocolate, just by its colour. And content is very similar. Its appearance can provoke an emotional response. Content that triggers an emotional reaction is far more likely to hit our chosen goals of Hooking, Engaging, Impacting, Motivating and (perhaps most importantly) Retaining.

The mainline to your audience’s emotion cupboard is the banner statement or the headline. To quote (leading neuro-scientist who has offered a theory about the relationship between human emotions and human rationality) Antonio Damasio: “We are not thinking machines that feel, we are feeling machines that think.” Headlines represent the visual punch of any page. Get this visual punch right and you'll encourage your audience to read the content of the page.

Studies suggest that headlines, which convey clear emotions promote collaboration and sharing. These are the triple twenty of a successful marketing strategy. A headline that can elicit a strong positive or negative emotion has the power to provoke action. (Customers may be more inclined to retweet, or share it). But what kinds of elicited emotions are desirable? Well they're not all good. The most commonly shared headlines inspire awe, provoke anxiety or cause anger.

Want to read Part V?

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