How Important is Typography?

19
Jun
2014

How Important is Typography?

How Important is Typography?
Writing is the bread and butter of content creation. It’s at the very heart of what we do here. You can’t transcreate out of nowhere, and you can’t design quality content around ‘Lorem Ipsum’. All too often, though, the writing part of the design process is overlooked. After all, there are more interesting things to focus on, right? Images, flourishes, colours? Wrong. Typography matters. First of all, imparting meaning is the main aim of any collateral. Design helps with this, sure, but it’s the words that do the donkeywork. So they need to be clear and legible. Body copy should conform in a neat font that’s neither too swirly nor serify, and large enough to be easy to read without taking up too much space. When it come to titles and standfirsts, there’s a bit more freedom and as a result, people like to play with fonts more. Different kinds of typography seem to say different things, and provide another opportunity to project your desired brand image. For example, Didot and other similar serifs immediately scream ‘fashion’ and ‘luxury’ – probably because we’re so used to seeing it across the pages of Vogue, Harpers Bazaar and other high-end fashion magazines. Something like Helvetica, on the other hand, is simple and functional, so works extremely well for body copy or in bold for titles on less immaculately designed or ‘flowery’ products. Our advice? Put some serious thought into the fonts you choose when designing collateral. Do they complement each other? Are they clear? Do they say what you think they say? There’s a tendency to sometimes fall back on ‘swirly’ fonts to give an air of classiness, but they’re rarely as effective as they’re intended to be. Most of the time, they’re either unreadable or a bit naff. Consider the weight and style of the font you use – P22 Underground in light is a totally different beast than P22 Underground in heavy, and when italicised a lot of fonts take on an entirely different character. Do your research, don’t be afraid to test things out, and above all, come up with a coherent style guide so that there’s consistency across all your products. Make sure that your typography choices become synonymous with your brand.
Bookmark and Share
Comments 0 comments
leave a reply