Shakespeare’s Globe

Shakespeare’s Globe

We were thrilled when one of London’s most treasured visitor attractions, Shakespeare’s Globe, approached us to develop their Chinese social media presence. Our challenge was to inform and engage potential visitors in China at (or before) the planning stage of their journeys to London, whilst spreading the word of Shakespeare’s Globe in general and enhancing their brand presence and authority in China.

Translation

Before getting to the all-important social media campaign, we had to ensure that there was something waiting at the Globe’s English website for Chinese visitors to engage with. So we identified the parts of the site most relevant to our campaign and set about transcreating them in an easy-to-digest, informative way. The result? A microsite in Chinse (and Japanese) that provided all of the information a visitor to Shakespeare’s Globe would need to know when planning their journey.

Our Approach

We sat down with the lovely team at the Globe to ascertain the precise message that they wanted to project, and got a grasp on the type of content that characterises their Western social media output. When we were satisfied that we understood the company and their aims, we set out our own goals so that we had a clear path to achieving them. Then we got to the best bit – creating the content.

The Content

We love literature in all its forms here at Rhubarb Fool, so getting enthusiastic about Shakespeare 伦敦莎士比亚环形剧场的微博_微博wasn’t a challenge. The content we produced in-house was an authoritative mix of ‘did you know’ facts, stunning, wanderlust-inducing pictures of The Globe and surrounding South Bank, news and events information, itineraries, and promotion for the Shakespeare’s Globe online shop. All with a scattering of quotes from the bard himself, of course. Everything was tailored to the interests of the Chinese market.

The next step? To get it translated. And we don’t work with just anybody. We consulted our network of Chinese copywriters to make sure that nothing was lost in translation. Working in collaboration, our Chinese representative was able to go above and beyond and interact with followers, as well as handle the technical aspects of managing a Weibo profile.

The Results

In just a few months, we achieved a Level 4 user badge with 3, 610 followers and over 300 posts. In total, the posts had been read an impressive 90, 000 times (at the last check, there’s no telling how many times they’ve been read since then!), and on average each post was read around 300 times. Our most-read post (about a music performance in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse) had 5, 217 views.

Our followers were not only Shakespeare and culture enthusiasts, but just the right demographic – hitting the 25-34 year olds who account for 38.6% of visits to London (according to VisitBritain). High-profile followers included not only British favourites London & Partners, The View From The Shard, VisitBritain and the Royal College of Art, but key Chinese opinion leaders: Gina Wang (a celebrity and writer with 3 million followers), Hangzhou Grand Theatre (10k followers), Hangzhou Damai Theatre (10K followers), Jingjing Radio Station (10K followers), Beijing Theatre Group (5K followers), Director Jiang Haiyang (10K followers), and BNBB Global Chinese Arts News (630K followers). In the future, we would predict that continuing to engage with these KOLs would increase our follower numbers exponentially, something we would support with other marketing options tailored to the Chinese market (such as PPC advertising, a .cn site and more).

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