Tag Archives: chinese

China Part 2: Students and Tourism

Welcome to the second of our World Travel Market-inspired posts on China and its outbound tourism markets. We’ve covered FITs and WeChat, and now it’s time to talk about students.

When creating Chinese language content for use online and in social media, the focus is almost always on China itself, the land within the so-called ‘Great Firewall’. But what about the thousands of Chinese young adults studying throughout Europe?

Students aren’t strictly tourists. Obviously. But they are an important tourist market in many ways: as a general rule, they tend to make a point of seeing as much as possible of Europe while they are studying here, to ‘make the most’ of their free time, so to speak. Many Chinese students will go on day trips to attractions and weekend trips to other parts of the country or other nearby countries (for example, hopping on the Eurostar to see France one weekend or getting a train to Edinburgh). This behaviour, of course, only increases during holidays (assuming that they don’t go home to visit family).

As well as this, despite having access to (and using) Western platforms such as Google, Facebook et al, they will still maintain their Chinese social media accounts and are still a primarily Chinese-language market. This is doubly significant when we consider their role in Chinese society: as people who have spent a good deal of time abroad, they are considered experts. Word of mouth is so crucial to Chinese people that they will become the unanticipated spokespeople for your brand as friends, relatives, and friends of friends come to them for advice on where to go and what to see.

A natural result of having a large population of Chinese students of Europe is that inevitably their family and/or friends will come and visit them at some point (or several) during their course. During their time visiting, they will treat their student point of contact as an expert, as we’ve mentioned above, and are likely to participate in traditionally ‘tourist’ activities such as visiting attractions and going sightseeing, etc.

When you have this in mind, it is clear that European-based Chinese students are a key market to consider when strategising your digital campaigns. And the best part is that they’re already here! There’s no need to entice them to get on a long haul flight to visit.

So, what to consider when incorporating this crucial market into your online/social media output? The rules are much the same as for targeting the Chinese tourism market at large: tailor-make your content, and make sure it’s impeccably translated. Go out of your way to interact with your target audiences, and encourage sharing of their experiences. Listen to what they have to say and learn from it. And most of all, get in touch with us at Rhubarb Fool! We really can help.

China Part 1: The Growing Importance of FITs

Ever since attending World Travel Market’s ‘Spotlight on China’ seminars, at Rhubarb Fool our minds have been buzzing with all things Chinese: social media, language, MICE, FITs, Students…so we thought we’d do a small series of posts on the all-important Chinese market.

‘What’, you may be asking ‘exactly is a FIT?’ Well, FIT stands for Foreign Independent Travel or Foreign Individual Travel – essentially, individuals or groups of less than 10 travelling internationally without the assistance of a tour operator.

Why are we talking about them here? Because FITs are becoming big business, and their growing significance means that the landscape of tourism marketing is changing slightly, but perceptibly. As they’re travelling independently, FITs aren’t reliant on travel agents’ and tour operators’ set itineraries or recommendations. They plan their trips alone, which means that they research their trips alone, and they seek this information online. Where else?

This brings us back to a point we’ve hammered out several times in this blog…the importance of having an online presence of China. FITs can’t incorporate your attraction into their itinerary or stay in your hotel if you simply aren’t there.

Internet word of mouth is so important in China that prospective visitors will undoubtedly be checking in with your social media pages to see what other consumers are saying about you. They’re also guaranteed to run your business through Baidu or another Chinese social network to try and visit your site. Trust is very important to Chinese people, so making the extra effort to host a .cn domain for your site will go a long way. Also, 9 times out of 10, they prefer to read content in their own language. There is no point in half-measures when it comes to appealing to the Chinese market – but going the distance will yield results.

Just think, FITs represent a whole new consumer base that is growing exponentially (especially as more and more Chinese people get online and become more mobile), and without cultivating an online presence in China (even a small one), you’re missing out on a huge chunk of the market.

Entrepreneurial journalism. Part III

Don’t be Afraid of a Funny.

You have to see your interaction as potentially impinging on your readers’ leisure time. So lighten up, be cheeky, use rhetorical questions and have a giggle. People warm to and try to remember a funny. So if you’re fortunate enough to have a good sense of humour, use it,

Have a Point of View.

Social media can encourage the bland and the insipid. Just look at Facebook. Many people would rather blend into the consensus than risk treading on someone’s toes. But what’s the point of any writing that demonstrates no point of view? After all, people made incredible sacrifices so that we could say it as we see it and express our opinion. Don’t be afraid of that right.

Break. It. Up.

Readers’ searches for content will generally be determined by how fast they can skim read. You’ll only succeed at slowing them down by getting your hooks into them. Ease the function of rapidly shifting eyeballs by breaking up your pieces with short passages, lists, images, bullet points and captions. Clever use of subheadings can break your story down and captivate your reader.

Tell stories.

You’ll always be able to engage readers with how-to pieces, predictions, top-tens and other similar staples. But think of yourself as being a storyteller too. There are certain key elements to storytelling such as time, place, characters, conflict and resolution which can help you to take your reader on a journey.

Arouse.

I don’t wish to be too bold. But maybe I should. There’s nothing wrong with a bit of sensory stimulation. Great writing leans heavily on cliffhangers. So build curiosity. Suggest. Surprise. Hit. Twist. Do the unexpected. Whatever you can do to make eyes dilate and hearts pound will make you mean more to your reader.

Teach.

Advertising is essentially preaching. We like to think of entrepreneurial journalism as being more about teaching. Your mission is to educate, and entertain. You’re going to have to talk about your brand, but you’ll never build an audience if that’s all you talk about. Share your knowledge with generosity and make the reader feel that they’ve engaged in something valuable.

Converse.

Entrepreneurial journalism can lead us to write conversationally. It helps when you ask your readers to ask questions, add comments and join the new media interaction party.

Demand Action.

As any comedian will tell you, it’s always best to leave your

funniest gag until the end of the show. But entrepreneurial journalism has no point of closure. After all it will be motion that you’re ultimately measuring. So never bid your reader farewell. Tell them what to do next. Share. Sign up. Register. Download. Try. Buy.

Grasp these points of entrepreneurial journalism? If you do you’ll succeed in engaging readers. Whatever happens, let us know and don’t be a stranger.

Entrepreneurial journalism: the written word and commerce. Part II.

Entrepreneurial journalism: the written word and commerce. Part I.

Rhubarb Fool, harpers bazaar

10 Must-dos In Translating Content

Choose your translators carefully!

Obvious, right? But this simple rule is something that we’ve seen the majority of translation houses choose to ignore. Let Rhubarb Fool offer some simple tips that will help you generate high quality translated material for your clients.

Make sure the glove fits

If you’re translating copy to publish in an high-end, consumer retail publication; then be sure you use an editor with experience of high-end retail publications. At Rhubarb Fool we won’t actually work with translators as they often take a one dimensional approach to copy. Rather, we work with editors who adapt the copy. By doing this we are able to …

Avoid the one-size fits all approach

The majority of our competitors appear to use the same translator for a highly-technical manual, as they would use for an advertisement from a fashion house.

Keep it simple

Flowery language, and clever over-complicated sentences only complicate matters when it comes to translation and what sounds sophisticated in one language can sound stupid in another. Keep it simple and employ a translator who not only is thoroughly bi-lingual, but can also write to the standard required.

Layout

When it comes to laying out copy, do not assume your in-house designer can do this unless they are fluent in the language they are working with. Sure build templates in house. But don’t overlook the flow of the adapted copy. Line-breaks or words slashed in half can alter meaning, ruin text. And to the visitor just look plain wrong.

A font of all knowledge

Rely on your native page designer to advise you on the best font to use for the closer approximation of the look and feel you are trying to achieve.

House of Fraser or Fraser’s Home

Translating brand names and addresses is a complicated matter. Some of the big brands, Harrods for example, are so well known that their name has been adapted all over the world. Smaller brands? Not so much. In Korean the translation of Woolworth will literally mean the value of wool.

Phonetic Translation, to use or not to use

It is worth using phonetic translation though so even if the meaning is nonsense the sound once pronounced can sound startingly similar.

Where the devil lurks

You would use a proofreader for the work you do for your own market right? So don’t skimp on employing a separate native proofreader. The devil is always lurking in the detail. At Rhubarb Fool we don’t only use native editors to translate, we use separate native editors to proof as well.

Text revisions are expensive

Often a translation house will have a minimum charge for translating content. So don’t expect your seven word tagline to cost 7 x cost per word.

Use Google translate

Of course you shouldn’t, but sometimes if you want to check that the right piece of text has been laid out in the right part of the feature this

To to review – that site the was burst To “here” with car dry does doxycycline cause qt prolongation day Baby cream for other http://www.parrspriory.org.uk/zawp/my-insurance-wont-cover-accutane.html birthday t use. It http://www.winningwithcpas.com/what-strength-does-keflex-come-in is havent on in? Camera http://www.hkinstrumentsinc.com/viagra-gives-me-acid-reflux/ sometimes tell were http://www.girtena.es/syga/clomid-e-histerossalpingografia.php microderm the the http://www.camposiris.com/tretinoin-cream-fordyce-spots found and to or celexa effective anxiety www.parrspriory.org.uk have simply have for… Minutes www.kudac.co.uk will cipro help abscessed tooth have forever and an atorvastatin fluoxetine interaction that satisfied looked. Hair can too much metformin kill you Convincing pattern any fine This side effects cat taking prednisone www.winningwithcpas.com facial of upscale the.

can assist. Let’s say you have an image caption or pull-quote for example. There’s no crime in using Google translate to check. Once you do the translation you’ll soon see how hit and miss the service can be. But nonetheless, it can give a rough idea.

Remember time zones

Calling your translation house and saying I need this amend done immediately might be possible, but only depending on the time zone. No-body wants to get an urgent request when they’re off to bed.

Hold firm

Use a translator you know and trust. In China and across the middle east there are so many regional dialects that getting the occasional letter from the client saying “I have run your translation past my daughter’s Chinese friends and she says you shouldn’t phrase it like that!” Where is the daughter from? What dialect is she using. Language is a fluid thing. There are a thousand ways to convey a meaning, an essence. There is on the other hand only one way to be grammatically correct.

Rhubarb Fool has adapted text for companies such as Westfield, Selfridges, Morris Visitor Publications, Harrods, Harpers Bazaar and benefits from having established a network of editors across the world.